AFFINER PAR TYPE
  • Rapports/études/travaux (documents) (0)
  • Rapports/études/travaux (collections) (0)
  • Législation et Réglementation (0)
  • Statistiques, Chiffres et données (0)
  • Organismes de recherche (0)
  • Organisations gouv. et internationales (0)
  • ONG, Associations, Entreprises (0)
  • Outils de recherche de l'information (0)
  • Tous les types (0)
AFFINER LA RECHERCHE

DETAIL DE LA NOTICE

2014-Biotechnology in Europe: the tax, finance and regulatory framework and global policy comparison

http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/EY-biotechnology-in-europe-cover/$FILE/EY-biotechnology-in-europe.pdf

Rapports/études/travaux (documents)

langue Anglaise

The report provides a comprehensive study of the leading 17 European biotech countries comparing their advantages and disadvantages. The survey analyses the tax, financial and regulatory incentives these individual jurisdictions provide to investors, entrepreneurs, manufacturers and researchers. It also weighs the financial burdens for SMEs and which benefits are likely to flow from a decision to establish a research facility or start-up in a particular market. Key non-EU global locations for biotechnology were also profiled on the increasingly important topic of R&D incentives. The report surveyed 9 comparable markets across North America, Australasia and emerging regions. The global comparison highlights the increasingly important topic of R&D incentives. Additionally, the report contains detailed discussions with top industry and venture capital stakeholders about their visions for the future of the industry in Europe.

The key findings of the report’ identify substantial variations in regulatory policy for biotechnology companies across different member states.  The differences range from basic policies and regulations which encourage financing for start-ups, to the ability to attract competent managers and entrepreneurs. The report shows some governments already have recognized the importance of policies and programs that foster a strong community of large corporations and SMEs in biotechnology, including R&D tax credits or low corporation tax, while other governments have not yet capitalized on these incentives. It also details that some governments have refined their regimes governing the treatment of license boxes, so that tax on intellectual property rights can be reduced.

The report finds that in today’s market, biotech entrepreneurs should strive early on in the product development cycle to develop a suite of products, not just a single one, so that they can increase their chances of securing backing from an investor and creating a product which reaches the market.

The report stresses that governments need to encourage SMEs to take steps which may help them one day to become large firms in their own right. The report states that in addition to the appropriate amount of regulation and incentives, what is needed is for governments to foster a climate of innovation an

- See more at: http://www.europabio.org/press/european-biotech-research-development-and-innovation-incentives-need-ensure-greater-economic#sthash.xzKcdual.dpuf

The report provides a comprehensive study of the leading 17 European biotech countries comparing their advantages and disadvantages. The survey analyses the tax, financial and regulatory incentives these individual jurisdictions provide to investors, entrepreneurs, manufacturers and researchers. It also weighs the financial burdens for SMEs and which benefits are likely to flow from a decision to establish a research facility or start-up in a particular market. Key non-EU global locations for biotechnology were also profiled on the increasingly important topic of R&D incentives. The report surveyed 9 comparable markets across North America, Australasia and emerging regions. The global comparison highlights the increasingly important topic of R&D incentives. Additionally, the report contains detailed discussions with top industry and venture capital stakeholders about their visions for the future of the industry in Europe.

The key findings of the report’ identify substantial variations in regulatory policy for biotechnology companies across different member states.  The differences range from basic policies and regulations which encourage financing for start-ups, to the ability to attract competent managers and entrepreneurs. The report shows some governments already have recognized the importance of policies and programs that foster a strong community of large corporations and SMEs in biotechnology, including R&D tax credits or low corporation tax, while other governments have not yet capitalized on these incentives. It also details that some governments have refined their regimes governing the treatment of license boxes, so that tax on intellectual property rights can be reduced.

The report finds that in today’s market, biotech entrepreneurs should strive early on in the product development cycle to develop a suite of products, not just a single one, so that they can increase their chances of securing backing from an investor and creating a product which reaches the market.

The report stresses that governments need to encourage SMEs to take steps which may help them one day to become large firms in their own right. The report states that in addition to the appropriate amount of regulation and incentives, what is needed is for governments to foster a climate of innovation an

- See more at: http://www.europabio.org/press/european-biotech-research-development-and-innovation-incentives-need-ensure-greater-economic#sthash.xzKcdual.dpuf

The report provides a comprehensive study of the leading 17 European biotech countries comparing their advantages and disadvantages. The survey analyses the tax, financial and regulatory incentives these individual jurisdictions provide to investors, entrepreneurs, manufacturers and researchers. It also weighs the financial burdens for SMEs and which benefits are likely to flow from a decision to establish a research facility or start-up in a particular market. Key non-EU global locations for biotechnology were also profiled on the increasingly important topic of R&D incentives. The report surveyed 9 comparable markets across North America, Australasia and emerging regions. The global comparison highlights the increasingly important topic of R&D incentives. Additionally, the report contains detailed discussions with top industry and venture capital stakeholders about their visions for the future of the industry in Europe.

The key findings of the report’ identify substantial variations in regulatory policy for biotechnology companies across different member states.  The differences range from basic policies and regulations which encourage financing for start-ups, to the ability to attract competent managers and entrepreneurs. The report shows some governments already have recognized the importance of policies and programs that foster a strong community of large corporations and SMEs in biotechnology, including R&D tax credits or low corporation tax, while other governments have not yet capitalized on these incentives. It also details that some governments have refined their regimes governing the treatment of license boxes, so that tax on intellectual property rights can be reduced.

The report finds that in today’s market, biotech entrepreneurs should strive early on in the product development cycle to develop a suite of products, not just a single one, so that they can increase their chances of securing backing from an investor and creating a product which reaches the market.

The report stresses that governments need to encourage SMEs to take steps which may help them one day to become large firms in their own right. The report states that in addition to the appropriate amount of regulation and incentives, what is needed is for governments to foster a climate of innovation an

- See more at: http://www.europabio.org/press/european-biotech-research-development-and-innovation-incentives-need-ensure-greater-economic#sthash.xzKcdual.dpuf

The report provides a comprehensive study of the leading 17 European biotech countries comparing their advantages and disadvantages. It also surveys nine comparable markets across North America, Australasia and emerging regions. It analyses the tax, financial and regulatory incentives these individual jurisdictions provide to investors, entrepreneurs, manufacturers and researchers. It also weighs the financial burdens for SMEs and which benefits are likely to flow from a decision to establish a research facility or start-up in a particular market. Key non-EU global locations for biotechnology were also profiled on the increasingly important topic of RDI incentives.

The report identifies substantial variations in regulatory policy for biotechnology companies across different member states. The differences range from basic policies and regulations which encourage financing for start-ups, to the ability to attract competent managers and entrepreneurs. Some governments have already recognized the importance of policies and programs that foster a strong community of SMEs in biotechnology, including RDI tax credits or low corporation tax, while other governments have not yet capitalized on these incentives. It also details that some governments have refined their regimes governing the treatment of license boxes, so that tax on intellectual property rights can be reduced.

In today’s market, biotech entrepreneurs need to strive early on in the product development cycle to develop a suite of products, not just a single one, so that they can increase their chances of securing backing from an investor and creating a product which reaches the market.

The findings show that governments need to encourage SMEs to take steps which may help them one day to become large firms in their own right. In addition to the appropriate amount of regulation and incentives, what is needed is for governments to foster a climate of innovation and entrepreneurship.  [Résumé de l'éditeur]

Ernst & Young / Europabio, 232 p., Mars 2014

26 janvier 2015

A.Vertier

Retour vers la page précédente