from left to right, pink flamingos in Camargue, Le Corum Conference Venue, Théatre Comédie and the tram, Pic Saint Loup vineyards, Saint Guilhem le Désert (Photo credits : Le Corum, J. Guyonnet, G. Llambrich)
  Sessions

• Rhizo-technologies – Applications of rhizosphere research
• Cutting edge approaches/methodologies
• Modelling and upscaling
• Symbioses and plant growth promotion
• Functional and structural diversity – bacteria
• Functional and structural diversity – fungi and mesofauna
• Physical structures and interactions
• Impacts of GMOs
• Root growth and plant functional diversity
• Fate and management of nutrients
• Molecular communication and adaptation
• Multitrophic interactions
• Biological control and plant health management
• Rhizoremediation and soil pollution
• Climate change, C and N cycling
• Commercialisation and sustainable development
• Human health and nutrition

Detailed description of the sessions


Rhizo-technologies – Applications of rhizosphere research


This session describes how rhizosphere technologies are being used to enhance sustainable agricultural and forest ecosystems and societies. This session also contains presentations describing the future potential of rhizosphere technologies to tackle real world problems.

 

Cutting edge approaches/methodologies

This session deals with innovative techniques (laboratory or field scale) which have been recently developed to advance rhizosphere research from a range of perspectives (e.g. genomics, metabolomics and proteomics of plants and microorganisms, microcosm design, rhizosphere microsampling methods, new isotopic techniques, biochemical, chemical and physical analysis etc).

 

Modelling and upscaling
This session deals with the latest research in mathematical modelling of rhizosphere processes and also issues concerned with scaling up experimental results and models from the laboratory microcosm through to the whole soil profile, field and landscape level. For example, the contributions can be associated with the modelling of processes (nutrient, water, pollutant, carbon flow, microbial movement, chemotaxis, disease control etc), statistical manipulation of genetic data (e.g. genomics, metabolomics), the scaling of technologies from the laboratory to the field etc.

 

Symbioses and plant growth promotion

This session deals with symbiotic interactions in the rhizosphere (e.g. N2 fixation, mycorrhizas etc) and research into plant growth promoting organisms inhabiting the rhizosphere (PGPRs).

 

Functional and structural diversity – bacteria

This session deals with all aspects of bacterial diversity in the rhizosphere.

 

Functional and structural diversity – fungi and mesofauna

This session deals with all aspects of fungal or mesofaunal diversity in the rhizosphere. This session also intends to include studies on other organism groups (viruses, and eucaryotes such as algae and protozoa, etc).

 

Physical structures and interactions

This session deals with the influence of soil and plant physics on rhizosphere interactions (e.g. spatial heterogeneity, physics of water flow, soil compaction, physical constraints on root and microbial growth etc).

 

Impacts of GMOs

This session is concerned with the impact of genetically modified organisms (GMOs; both plants and microorganisms) on rhizosphere processes. Contributions can address issues relating to the environmental impact of GMOs (i.e. potential negative effects) or ways of harnessing GMOs to enhance processes in the rhizosphere (e.g. for enhancing disease control, C sequestration, nutrient uptake; i.e. potential positive effects).

 

Root growth and plant functional diversity

This session deals with all aspects of root development and function from a rhizosphere perspective. The session also welcomes contributions from researchers studying the impact of plant communities on rhizosphere processes and vice versa.

 

Fate and management of nutrients

This session deals with the cycling of nutrients and water within the rhizosphere. Here nutrients are defined in the widest sense (i.e. both inorganic and organic).

 

Molecular communication and adaptation

This session deals with signalling pathways in the rhizosphere. This largely includes microbe-microbe interactions, root-microbe interactions not covered in the session ‘Symbioses and plant growth promotion’ and root-root interactions.

 

Multitrophic interactions

This session is intended to address the biological complexity of the rhizosphere and the flow of C and nutrients through the rhizosphere food web.

 

Biological control and plant health management

This session deals with the control of pathogens in the rhizosphere and also allelopathy in plants.

 

Rhizoremediation and soil pollution

This session deals with the effects of soil pollutants on plant roots and rhizosphere microorganisms and vice versa, including the role of rhizosphere processes for remediating contaminated soil. The session welcomes contributions on inorganic (e.g. heavy metals and metalloids, radionucleides) and organic (e.g. PAHs, PCBs, pesticides) pollutants, as well as human pathogens (e.g. E. coli O157, Salmonella).

 

Climate change, C and N cycling

This session deals with the influence of climate and management change on rhizosphere processes (e.g. C flow, C sequestration, biodiversity) and potential feedback controls (e.g. greenhouse gas emissions). The topic of management changes includes alterations in land use (e.g. pesticide and fertilizer use, conversion from one land use to another etc).

 

Commercialisation and sustainable development
This session covers how rhizosphere technologies have been designed for contributing the sustainable development (from the research-development stage through to commercial products).

 

Human health and nutrition

This session deals with the future potential of rhizosphere research and technologies for solving issues relating to human health (the rhizosphere as a reservoir of potential human pathogens) and human nutrition (the rhizosphere as a means to improve the quality and quantity of food products).
from left to right, root nodule of Crotalaria, ectomycorrhizas of pine trees, bacteria attracted by exudates at the apex of a rice root, iron oxide precipitation in the rhizosphere of a eucalypt root, calcified roots in the garrigues bush (Photo credits : LSTM, UMR R&S, J. Guimberteau).
Directeur de la publication : Philippe Hinsinger - Coord. admin. : Sophie Pirkin
Conception / administration : Sébastien Lamy (coll. Corinne Dasen, Magalie Collet) - Graphisme : Georges LLambrich
Copyright © INRA 2006 | Crédits | Mentions légales | Mise à jour : 09 janvier 2008